Tag Archives: nike

FLIGHT

Alongside some other strong projects of late, Nike and Virgil Abloh’s ten silhouette collaboration (and it’s been entertaining witnessing the volume of begrudging respect for the output, even from some of the staunchest OFF-WHITE haters) feels like the antidote to the conceptual mass of the same old same every weekend. As the NYC workshops start, the accompanying “In Conversation” series (with some deep chats on the Air Force 1 and Blazer planned) allows for some history as well as the budding futurist, rip-it-up spirit. Virgil, Spike Lee (“Some people are faking the funk on the culture“), Don C and Aleali May’s “FLIGHT” panel talk contains several irreverent gems during its 48-minute duration. This YouTube broadcast of “FLIGHT” is a good example of when content goes right, down to the ill-timed R Kelly reference and candid audience participation (that Bloody Osiris observation from Tremaine is correct) that probably had someone at Nike Digital sweating. Continue reading FLIGHT

STUFF I LIKE

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There’s a lot of content out there right now that isn’t just garbage reactionary editorials, brand money blown for the sake of it (does anyones actually buy anything because of a group of hastily gathered young “cultural disruptors” leaning against stuff shot in a sub-Tillmans style?) or Google sating SEO padding to get that ranking. I’ve been enjoying episodes of Red Bull TV’s Social Fabric, the micro histories of key garments presented by Brain Dead’s Kyle Ng. Kyle is a charismatic frontman, and the decision to split the 25 minute episodes into roughly three perspectives means it highlights some global scenes, smaller brands and crafts without being bogged down by a need to be encyclopaedic. The camo and plaid ones are particularly interesting. Whatever your opinion of its CEO and his questionable politics (like Vice, it’s a shame knowing that even the most left-wing messaging bankrolls bad-minded billionaires somewhere down the line), RBMA and Red Bull TV seem to be the content kings on niche topics — I knew that this would be decent, but I wasn’t expecting almost 5 hours of footage on tap for series one.

Seeing as the Skepta Sk AIR logo was all over IG during the last few weeks, we should probably pay respects to the man behind the original graphic language for Nike’s AIR family (Tuned, Total, Zoom, Max and Low) in 1998. The creator of the original Tn logo (as well as the Griffey Swingman) is Derek Welch, and the story of his career, illness and recovery is both sobering and life-affirming — the Adventures in Design podcast spoke to him at length for an April episode and I can’t recommend it enough.

British hip-hop journo Andrew Emery of Fat Lace, HHC and plenty of other periodicals had a stab at rapping in his younger days alongside Mr. Dan Greenpeace and friends. He just put out a memoir of his time growing up as a rap fanatic just outside of Nottingham and in Leeds — an experience shared by legions of earnest young pre-Internet folks getting it wrong through their attempts to be down when retail resources and posses are somewhat limited. What a glorious struggle it was to emulate Compton, Philly and Brooklyn using local amenities. Wiggaz With Attitude: My Life as a Failed White Rapper is out now and available here. I’m interesting to see Emery and Greenpeace’s The Book of Hip-Hop Memorabilia if it ever happens. Incidentally, this is liable to be the only autobiography ever include a paragraph on the Hi-Tec Tec basketball shoe.

SPORTING GOODS ’94

Didn’t have much to add here, but this footage from a sporting goods show (possibly filmed around early 1994) has some brief gems in it. Presenter Mark White upped the clip on YouTube and the interesting stuff arrives near the end — legendary Nike spokesperson Liz Dolan introducing the Air Max2 system and the CB 94, plus the obscure Tinker Hatfield designed sandal called the Nike Free that would, apparently inform the Nike Free technology his brother helped helm several years ago. Reebok — then caught up in a war with Nike — debut BOKS hikers and the InstaPump technology via the Pump Fury. Blink and you’ll miss those Jordan III retros too.

T-SHIRT KINGS

Knowledge god Mr. Brendan Dunne of Sole Collector put me onto a little project that appeared on Nike Harajuku’s blog at the end of last month. Nike Basketball seem to have teamed with Shirt Kings (presumably PHADE is involved?) for a set of t-shirts. Having worked with Supreme and Stüssy a while back, the Nike project is an interesting evolution that legitimises their work after years of homaging Nike classics like the Air Force II in their art, and including an artist called NIKE in the team. The uninitiated might be baffled at the cartoonish graffiti art, but it’s important to reiterate the importance of their work in hip-hop fashion and streetwear in general. I conducted a very brief interview with PHADE for Stüssy in 2014 that’s reprinted below:

Taking a graphic identity from trains to torsos, this is a little story that needs to be told.

Anybody that ever appreciated a hand style or graffiti iconography on a t-shirt, probably owes the Shirt Kings a little something. Before Shirt Kings, there was graffiti on vests and jackets, but this was one of the earliest examples of a successful company, despite being a labor-intensive production line rather than mass-produced gear. There’s a soul to each flashy, eccentric one of one that can’t be commercially reproduced.

The forefather of the hip-hop brands (arguably the real street wear companies) that would boom in the 1990s — whether it was PNB Nation, Phat Farm, Too Black Guys, Triple 5 Soul, Cross Colors or FUBU — was a spot in Jamaica Queens’ Colosseum Mall run by Edwin “PHADE” Sacasa, Rafael “KASHEME” Avery and Clyde “NIKE” Harewood. PHADE had been putting in work on trains with legends like KASE 2 after a move from Brooklyn to the Bronx in the 1970s, but it wasn’t until he took his skills to cotton in 1984 that he realised graffiti on apparel could be a lucrative endeavour, “Seeing the reaction to my graffiti pictures in school gave me the confidence to know I had something.” The move from spray can to airbrush wasn’t too severe a transition, “It was the same just a little bit more detailed.

The Shirt Kings name coined in 1986, with the company making power moves in 1988. Flicking through the pages of Sacasa and KET’s book, ‘Shirt Kings: Pioneers of Hip Hop Fashion‘ (Dokument Press, 2013), it becomes apparent that this trio was onto something significant. Their custom creations became a status symbol for every key New York rapper of the late 1980s as well as a rolling cast of hustlers, cool kids and Queens characters. Heavy D, Nas, Jay-Z and LL Cool J felt its influence. Even if their work on cotton rarely crossed the water or went all state, a global audience was exposed to the Shirt Kings’ art on Audio Two’s ‘What More Can I Say?‘, Biz Markie’s ‘Pickin’ Boogers‘ and the Transformers piece on the ‘Red Alert Goes Berzerk‘ sleeve. The crew even managed to get their work onto Bill Cosby’s back.

In terms of style, each New York borough brought its own aesthetic — PHADE noticed those differences, “The styles were different — each borough was unique in style and fashion. Brooklyn was an athletic, tough look, Bronx was a more rugged Timberland hood style and Queens was a kind of combination of Bronx ruggedness and Brooklyn flash style.” That variation in looks from neighbourhood to neighbourhood created its own set of creative challenges, twinned with the sheer speed that trends moved at — Champion, Coca-Cola gear, Air Force IIs, MCM and Gucci all had their moment as status symbols and each artist needed to be versed in that imagery, “The work was evenly dispersed. A customer may have a preference in artist because of relationship, but otherwise we trained to be one. Art never goes out of style. Luckily we were all graduates of The High School Of Art and Design in Manhattan, NY — all capable of working in any field in graphics.

Like getting a tattoo, Shirt Kings customers would get an initial consultation, “The customer played a big part in the process — we just were vehicles used to bring their vision to life.” In terms of cost, that work didn’t come cheap, “A shirt was around 50 dollars, we provided the garments unless the customer had a special item of clothing they wanted painting.” The work wasn’t a one-wear affair either, “The shirts were washable and kept their color if heat set hot and hand washed in cold water.

Another pioneer of New York street style from the same era, legendary Harlem tailor Daniel “Dapper Dan” Day played a key role in Shirt Kings’ success when PHADE took the brand to another iconic indoor marketplace, “Dapper Dan is my mentor. When I had expanded to The Mart 125 across from The World Famous Apollo Theater, he came and said, ‘We need to work together — come on down to my spot.’ I asked him how much rent and he replied, ‘No worries.’ He took me all up and down the East Coast selling clothes.

Dan’s exaggerated amplifications of luxury logos and prints are present in some of the company’s images. With their brand represented heavily during a golden age for street culture and music, PHADE, KASHEME and NIKE would become celebrities, with an escalating client base that led to two-week waits for product. From cars to gooned-out Roger Rabbits and diminutive psycho Chucky as a b-boy with a bucket hat and pager, some commissions were odder than others — PHADE had his limits, “I don’t do demonic stuff or negative images, just fun and culture.

Jamaica, Queens was no stranger to dancehall’s flamboyant fashions either — rudeboy customers had some wild requests, “They seemed to be big on the pants as well as the jackets. They expressly wanted explicit art on their clothes with rhinestones and rips and glitter.

If you’re wondering about how the Cosby connection came about, Shawn Carter plays his part, alongside Theo Huxtable, “We were invited to a party and Jay-Z was showcasing with Jaz-O, I saw Malcolm (Jamal-Warner) downstairs, I had the picture book that I carried everywhere we went — I gave it to one of our young interns and he approached Malcolm. We all came over and took pictures and next thing we were at Malcolm’s house in Brooklyn ordering shirts.

Shirt Kings would spawn imitators, but PHADE doesn’t see it as a negative, “I wouldn’t call them imitations. It was youth in a culture using their gift to cause other creators to start thinking about making their own way in this culture.” While KASHEME passed away, both PHADE and NIKE are still painting and airbrushing. PHADE has put his energies into working with non-profit groups to teach youngsters to create their own artwork and develop their own skill set and sense of empowerment.

Despite breaking it down it in more local terms, Sacasa acknowledges that the business’s legacy is colossal, “Shirt Kings design creations were pivotal to the foundation of the science in branding between hip hop artists and a designer who was an aerosol artist in the NYC subway days teaching kids how to do legal art on a t-shirt.

HALF OFF

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A while back I schemed to put something together regarding the relationship between hardcore and athletic shoes, but the task seemed colossal when it came to research and, crucially, I’m not qualified to write it. The connection between hip-hop and shoes has been mined to mediocrity in pursuit of content and, like some cultural fossil fuel, all that seems to be left — bar those untold stories and archives from those who were there — is fumes. In a cynical world, the do it yourself, self-powered earnestness of it all seems like the antithesis of a marketing grand plan. This ad from a 1986 Maximumrocknroll is just one of thousands of moments — the southern Californian band Half Off (rest in peace to Jim Burke) had a cult following and they briefly had a ‘zine-powered war of words with Youth Crew folks as mentioned in this Noisey Billy Rubin interview from a couple of years ago. The hand-drawn Vandal style Nike with the Terminator/Big Nike style lettering is a nice touch and on that topic hardcore connoisseur William Cathalina has put together a sneaker-centric ‘zine called Shoegazer, with issue #2 dedicated to shoes and the scene. The first run of 25 is long gone, but it’s worth giving him a shout via Instagram to see about a second run.

MORE STORE

mowabbazona

Sorry, I couldn’t help it. I had to make a fourth return to SHOP TOUR CANAL OFICIAL and their abundance of 1990s’ retail wanders. You can’t fake this era of sport shops and those shelves are ripe with masterpieces that everyone took for granted at the time. Even the budget takedown crap has turned to gold. This is the kind of thing that makes YouTube better than any terrestrial or cable channel. It’s 1992 and 1994 embodied in a few minutes of grainy camerawork and excitable chat, but alas, A Sports USA of 148 E Flagler St, Miami is apparently a luggage shop nowadays. Continue reading MORE STORE

THE 2ND PLACE

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2nd magazine is always pretty consistent, and their themed issues and specials are always worth adding to those teetering piles of publications you deemed necessary but haven’t fully digested yet. We single dialect doofuses used to justify buying Japanese magazines for the imagery alone, but with a new and improved Google Translate on the phone, we can glean a little extra information from them nowadays. Continue reading THE 2ND PLACE