Tag Archives: Michael Kopelman

GIMME FIVE’S ARCHIVE

PuppetG5

It goes without saying that Michael Kopelman and Gimme Five have been essential to my career progression (and I don’t think I’m alone in being grateful to Michael either). Given the company’s admirable reticence to do nostalgia, I always thought that a few stories in British streetwear were lost and the importance of what they did was overlooked. Thanks to Gimme Five, we were first when it came to discovering a lot of brands and the Gimme Five line itself was experimenting with Champion tees, parodies and collaborations way ahead of several others. Continue reading GIMME FIVE’S ARCHIVE

GIMME PiL

gimme5closeup

Gimme Five is one of the most important UK streetwear lines in history, but I suspect that it was overlooked for a few reasons. Firstly, it was on sale in accounts that held hype product like visvim and Supreme, thus Michael Kopelman’s brand sit in the shadows. Secondly, its distribution was scarce, the line was barely marketed and releases were sporadic. Continue reading GIMME PiL

HIT AND RUN

thefacehitandrun

There’s plenty of little moments scattered across publications that altered the course my career would take in one way or another. Back in mid 1998, The Face ran a ‘Fashion Hype’ (and hype would become a word attached to these objects like a particularly excitable Siamese twin in the decade that followed) piece on the newly opened Hit and Run store (which would be renamed The Hideout for presumed legal reasons by 2000). This two page spread was a rundown of things I’d never seen in the UK and sure enough never seen them with a pound price next to them. I immediately rushed out and asked a couple of Nottingham skate stores if they’d be getting any Ape, Supreme, GoodEnough or Let It Ride gear in, only to be met with a blank stare. lesson learnt: Kopelman had the hookups that the other stores didn’t. This Upper James Street spot was selling APC jeans for 48 quid, while Supreme tees were only a fiver less than they are now. The 1998 season when Supreme put out their AJ1, Casio, Champion tee, Goodfellas script design and Patagonia-parody jacket was particularly appealing, and it was showcased here, while SSUR keyrings, BAPE camo luggage and soft furnishings were a hint of things to come. I guarantee that once you made it to the store, a lot of the stuff that you assumed you could grab with ease would be gone — an early life lesson that hype just isn’t fair.