Tag Archives: complex



I wrote a little piece for my friends at Complex on the 30th anniversary of Spike Lee’s She’s Gotta Have It and its subsequent influence on sports footwear and the Air Jordan line. You can read it HERE or by clicking on the image above. A couple of bits that never made the final edit are below, because this place is a good place to dump unwanted paragraphs. Continue reading 30 YEARS OF SHE’S GOTTA HAVE IT & MARS’ AIR JORDANS


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I wrote some Euro-centric stuff about Gazelles that Complex kindly published. You can read it RIGHT HERE. Naturally, I rambled on and some stuff had to be cut, so I stuck it here. Deleted paragraphs in a deleted scenes style. I’ve never actually liked the Gazelle much beyond that 1991-1997 era, but I can understand the appeal and its popularity is significant. This is my last shoe history thing for a while because I’m starting to bore myself. Continue reading SUEDE & ANTELOPES



Not much to report here this evening, but you can find my rambling on why the late 1980s and early 1990s were sillier when it came to athletic footwear than 2016 over at Hypebeast, plus a quick chat with Don C about bootlegs, dope boys and other reasons why the Air Jordan II is underrated for Complex. That lazy use of links makes this the shortest entry on here in a while, but both pieces would have ended up here if the editors of those respective sites had rejected them. The HB piece is the first in an ongoing monthly column, so keep an eye out for another one.



The COMPLEX man dem have been longtime supporters of this site, so I’m always down to contribute to their ever-expanding empire. They’re always tolerant of my traffic haemorrhaging rantings, and with the past week being dedicated to people banging on about the resurrection of the MAG (then being inexplicably disappointed that they could’t immediately buy a pair for 250 quid), I jotted down a few thoughts on what the shoe inspired over the last 26 years beyond the fancy special effect lacing. Continue reading ‘PLEX & BOBBITO



I’ve got some other things ready to go up here, but there was a slight delay in obtaining the relevant imagery. So in the meantime, I’ll plug some other things — a couple of months ago I put together a rough ASICS history for size? (hopefully I’ll get the opportunity to refine and expand it a little soon) that you can see here, here and here. While I’m bored as hell with the slew of occasionally unremarkable collaborations dropping every hour, I’m obsessed with that brand’s 1985-1995 archive (some of the best pure sports performance design I’ve ever seen), I got the opportunity to visit their headquarters in Kobe last year and a quick spot of research revealed some superior apparel creations and logo design from the late 1980s. Currently, there’s a lot of interest in the brand’s early 1990s output and an emphasis on the same couple of silhouettes, but there’s a lot more to talk about. Last week I got the second opportunity to talk to Shigeyuki Mitsui, designer of the ASICS Gel-Lyte III (and co-designer on the Gel-Lyte and Gel-Lyte II). You can read the brief interview here on Complex UK (can you see that if you’re in the USA? I’m not sure). Apologies for the basic nature of the questions — Mitsui-san speaks perfectly proficient English, but a background of obvious hip-hop records booming meant that discussing anything that didn’t involved loud, short queries and pointing would be impossible to transcribe. The man’s skills and humility deserve respect.





First things first, I think Complex‘s HNIC, Rich Antoniello speaks a lot of truth in this video for the folks flooding the internet with hapless content strategy that are a waste of money (that I’d do excellent things with, given the chance). It’s interesting that we went from claiming that the 140 character approach to information distribution would dead long-form writing to suddenly getting excited about any “original content” that’s over 500 words, regardless of quality. Still, I’m not complaining, because this culture of content keeps me in Supermalt money every month, but those barely used hashtags that are part of a three-week promo strategy in the quest for that elusive, oft-discussed consumer engagement are just lurking in far-flung corners of social media platforms like sad phantoms in limbo, or those sickly, skeletal blogs that people send me as part of a CV to show that they’re assertive with just three entries that are all from March 2013.


If this site had a real name (I’m not sure that I’ve ever actually referred to it as GWARIZM in a blog entry), I’d make it a play on Champion in one way or another, seeing as it’s pretty much a Champion fan site. One thing I’ve bemoaned again and again is the UK’s raw deal when it comes to the brand — though, as I’ve mentioned, it’s the Animal Chin of sportswear in that it never seems to genuinely exist beyond a handful of global licences — with its budget status. That American licence has been all over the place, from the bulbous magnificence of their Modell’s fodder to the Todd Snyder stuff to the nasty shoe deal that puts out copycat, low-budget duds.

Over here, we haven’t seen much that’s interesting since stores like Aspecto got in some Reverse Weaves in the early 2000s (shouts to The Original Store for importing the goodness in recent years though). It’s been bad three-packs of socks, crappy sweatpants and anti-aspirational rubbish in the UK on the Champion front for a while and the launch of the Champion Europe site to sell in pounds sounded exciting until I saw the product on it (even the basic college gear fell short here through unnecessary and inexplicable embellishment — the antithesis of why pretty much everyone who loves Champion treats it with such reverence).

I even traded emails and calls with a friend as he crusaded to bring the good rather than bad Champion to these shores, to no avail. I was happy to see that we’re getting the simpler Reverse Weave pieces on these shores very, very soon, in what looks like a slimmer cut in line with Japanese pieces (even though I’m guessing by those blue labels, as opposed to the red ones, that it won’t be US-made). Sweatpants, crews and zip hoodies in navy or grey will be appearing at spots like Oi Polloi next month (as well as on the championstore.eu site) and I’m reliably informed that pale blues, heather and some other colours will make an appearance in March.

It’s baffling that its taken this long to happen, given the cult following of the little ‘C’ over here, but I’m guessing that it wasn’t easy to wrestle the name from whoever was abusing it. This is definitely a step in the right direction for fans of fleecewear that fights vertical shrinkage.


Record Store Day seems to be a time when a slew of cool shit you’ll never own drops and Joe Mansfield’s Beat Box: a Drum Machine Obsession documents his 75 strong drum machine collection, with a foreword by the Burroughs of the other kind of beat, Mr. Dave Tompkins. It drops in December and it’s on the list, but this special edition arrives early with a special 7-inch steeped in Paul Revere nerdery by correcting the direction of the drum program and a tape of beats made from the devices in the book. There’s soul in those 808s and this is a topic deserving of documentation.






It would appear that I’ve gone, to quote Pusha T, “Laptop hot, internet warm” of late with an unexpected inclusion here. I’m unlikely to start trying to tell anybody how to do up a tie or identify the suit that suits them. In fact, I feel bad for all the people who clicked through, then saw a rambling eulogy to Michael Winner and home invasion movies. Sorry about that. I suppose the recurring Lifshitz theme borders on menswear and, according to store employees (who, lest it look like I’m trivialising their unemployment in a tough market, assured me that the Lauren company is looking after me) the London Rugby Ralph Lauren store closes this weekend, as the Rugby side of the business draws to a close. Let’s face it, you never made a point of traveling to the stores, did you?

That’s because Rugby fell into a strange realm where the brand, launched in 2004, lacked any real identity beyond being a whippersnapper Polo. The preppy aesthetic is present in many Polo pieces and the majority of strong Rugby designs were pretty much interchangeable with its big brother. With the opening of a UK store in 2011 seemingly aimed at the sector who’d graduated from Superdry technical college to the former poly that was Jack Wills, I can’t help but think it was a little misplaced — timed just as Jack Wills wearing bellends made a slow move to Streetwear Dave brands like Hype. Can Ralph cash in on streetwear? He doesn’t need to, because he’s instrumental in igniting many, many, many facets of that industry (ask your favourite “streetwear” and skate brand overlords what their favourite brand is in terms of wear and inspiration). And, as I’ve noted here before, there’s an official Ralph Lauren site (Ralph Lauren Vintage) talking up Lo-Life favourites and pledging reissues. Ralph knows.

So that was the end of the brand launched to capture the hearts and expendable/parental income of 14-29 year olds. Better than CHAPS, but not as hard as ‘Lo — that’s what the gravestone will read. What will Rugby be remembered for? While the majority of the products blur into one vast beige cotton twill and navy mass with twee collegiate cues, the all-over skull embroideries were amazing. Who else pumped out prep-goth like that? With THC-addled YouTube conspiracists keen to pinpoint French Montana and friends as satan’s spawn for waving their fingers around in a certain way, there was something strangely subversive in how Rugby merrily took inspiration from Yale’s Skull and Bones secret society. One day you may mourn not picking up those shorts, if nothing else, because they’re currently being sold dirt cheap. Sadly, this secret society’s global conspiracy for world domination has come to a close.

While we’re talking dirt cheap Rugby, what’s all the fussing and grumbling about with regards to Pyrex Vision? Mad because they took a shirt and stick some letters on it? You would have been apoplectic in the early 1990s — those lazy folks, just sticking letters on Champion, Gildan and Hanes blanks. Are you really annoyed because they never took the ‘C’s off the mesh? André Courrèges tributes are nothing new, pretty much dating back to Supreme’s earliest days, but I salute Virgil and the crew for getting their Malcolm McLaren on. Reappropriate it, hype it and they will come. Isn’t that the essence of streetwear? Chuck a Dipset reference in and you’re good to go. I’ll take a hustle like that over whatever fake artisan crap I’m supposed to be taking an interest in at the moment. Spend less time moaning in comment sections and more time buying up closing sale gear and making famous friends and maybe you can make that Pyrex money too. Who needs coke and Arm & Hammer when you’ve got cotton and a buddy who screen prints?

Jean-Noël Kapferer’s ‘The Luxury Strategy: Break the Rules of Marketing to Build Luxury Brands’ is a pretty good read (example heading, ‘Prolonging the ecstasy of a privileged moment’) if you’re hunting case studies and theory. It’s doubly handy if you’re building your own cliquey, willfully exclusive brand (it’s a good accompaniment to your cut-price Rugby shirts and printing hookup), but I’ll discuss more about it another time. This diagram of the Ralph Lauren galaxy is taken from it. It lacks RRL and Polo Jeans for some reason, but it’s a quick-fix glimpse of an empire. You can bet something will appear to fill that middleground void and accompany Club Monaco.


Affordable and Ralph Lauren co-signed publication ‘Men’s File’ has got a book coming out in August called ‘Men’s File: Tracing the Roots of Style’, written by Nick Clements and released on rockabilly and Americana-centric imprint Korero books. Promising a visual collection that examines revivalism as something that’s far, far more than a game of regressive dress-up, going on the magazine’s work, this could be worth picking up.