Category Archives: Music



There are a lot of print tee brands out there. It’s no surprise either — there’s more outlets hungry for look books than ever before, IG and a Big Cartel can help you market and build a line, plus we all have infinite reference points at our fingertips. Continue reading TRUDGING SLOWLY OVER WET SAND



Every now and again I put together the kind of thing that would traditionally be here for somebody else. My friends at size? asked if I could throw together something on Helly-Hansen’s moment in the spotlight back in the 1990s, and its subsequent trend-level moments. It’s kind of a celebration and cautionary tale. I’ll always respect the brand for trying to take that Nautica cash and embracing its hip-hop audience to the point where they ran HH Dead Prez promos.

Got back to the mansion, to divvy up the paper/Helly-Hansen was the brain of the whole entire caper
Q-Tip ‘Drink Away the Pain’

I went from Helly-Hansen to mini mansions
Mase ‘Top of the World’

Had on the Helly-Hansen and a knot that was fat/Had the spotlight beaming on my Astro Black hat
Quasimoto, ‘Hittin’ Hooks’

I’m holding up for ransom, still rock the Helly-Hansen
Action Bronson ‘Brown Bag Wrap’

Continue reading HELLY-HANSEN & HIP-HOP



The COMPLEX man dem have been longtime supporters of this site, so I’m always down to contribute to their ever-expanding empire. They’re always tolerant of my traffic haemorrhaging rantings, and with the past week being dedicated to people banging on about the resurrection of the MAG (then being inexplicably disappointed that they could’t immediately buy a pair for 250 quid), I jotted down a few thoughts on what the shoe inspired over the last 26 years beyond the fancy special effect lacing. Continue reading ‘PLEX & BOBBITO



There’s a little game you can play using social media that I call D-lister fishing. Think of a fallen star or minor celeb of the past — ideally with an ego — and mention their name on Twitter, ideally in a positive rather than malicious or particularly nasty light (no direct @ allowed) and see if they’ll favourite, Retweet or plug a forthcoming project to you. Continue reading ONE SOUNDTRACK WONDERS



There’s nothing wrong with nostalgia — it beats trying to run after the young ‘uns and pretending that everything they utter is an essential insight. That’s because there’s nostalgia and then there’s just getting stuck in the mud. Don’t get me wrong, youth insight is important, but I’d sooner be looking up to Glenn O’Brien and Tim Blanks — both of whom don’t seem to waste their time assuming that the kids are the key to everything, and have dealt with recent job cutbacks in an unruffled manner that I found particularly inspirational. Continue reading POWELL & SAVILLE: ORIGINAL VLOGGERS & BLOGGERS



The problem with writing about subcultures is that if you weren’t there, you don’t know the full story. And even if you participated, everyone’s account has a tendency to differ. In the case of Duffer, you’ve got four founders, and everyone has their own story to tell. Contradictions are inevitable. Barrie Sharpe was one of the minds behind Duffer of St George and he’s also the rare groove originator alongside Lascelle Gordon. Continue reading THE MASTERPLAN



There’s lots of nostalgia for Mo’ Wax at the moment, now that most people have let some bygones be bygones (a superb unpublished article I read that was written a decade or so ago was significantly more negative). It led to some excellent celebratory moments last year, and I’m glad that Mo’ Wax Please have reupped a student documentary entitled The Man From Unkle from 2005, because I was convinced I imagined it after it was on YouTube a few years back. It’s not perfect: it has a spectacularly hungover James Lavelle interview, teases Will Bankhead and Ben Drury interviews that never happen, has a typically earnest student film voiceover (I’ve recorded a couple in my lifetime) and showcases some terrible Futura knockoff motion graphics that look like a pisshead Yoda. But there’s loads of good stuff during the 11 minute duration — Swifty being brutally honest is great and there’s a few trips to stores like Brighton’s Triage, DPMHI in its heyday, Foot Patrol in its old location with Wes at the counter (I miss sitting in the store to mutually moan and watch him terrorising idiots) and Offspring, before catching up with Craig Ford in the pub rocking a full zip BAPE hoody back when Hong Kong kids would sell their spleen for some red camo. A lot has changed, but plenty has stayed the same. I never expected to see any of the brands I was jocking back then putting out a PUMA Disc though. Things seem — somewhat paradoxically — friendlier, yet more full of hate than they did 10 years ago.