Category Archives: Movies



The COMPLEX man dem have been longtime supporters of this site, so I’m always down to contribute to their ever-expanding empire. They’re always tolerant of my traffic haemorrhaging rantings, and with the past week being dedicated to people banging on about the resurrection of the MAG (then being inexplicably disappointed that they could’t immediately buy a pair for 250 quid), I jotted down a few thoughts on what the shoe inspired over the last 26 years beyond the fancy special effect lacing. Continue reading ‘PLEX & BOBBITO



The speculation around the Nike MAG shoe as the date depicted in Back to the Future II rolls around is increasingly tedious. As a design, I think the shoe is amazing, and prescient (or at least, so influential on post-1989 design that it seemed prophetical), but it’s also food for the dullest kind of footwear-addled folks and their childish nostalgia and click bait headlines. Still, self-lacing shoes are an appealing prospect that I want to see. Continue reading THE OTHER SCI-FI SHOES



There’s a little game you can play using social media that I call D-lister fishing. Think of a fallen star or minor celeb of the past — ideally with an ego — and mention their name on Twitter, ideally in a positive rather than malicious or particularly nasty light (no direct @ allowed) and see if they’ll favourite, Retweet or plug a forthcoming project to you. Continue reading ONE SOUNDTRACK WONDERS



I try to support the zine realm when I can, and there’s some good spots selling a good selection right now. If you passed through the Lorimer Street L Train stop during 2013, you might have seen Alldayeveryday and Lele Saveri’s Newsstand project. Continue reading ZINES & VIOLENCE



Northerners stay winning. As I sit here in the Lake District, 5 hours from London, I’m aware that I’m in a place where justifying some GORE-TEX expense makes a little more sense. Clobber-loving print publications from that side of the UK impress me time and time again to the point where I’m starting to repeat myself every time I receive new copies. Far more than just being about a jacket and a certain swagger, the Oi Polloi empire has spread south of late, but their always-excellent Pica~Post is an antidote to the influx of digital look books showcasing hollow-cheeked dudes looking uncomfortable in Sports Direct style gear on the periphery of a housing estate (just far enough away to avoid any potential wallet inspectors). Issue #9 (which retails for the comedy price of just 2p) contains an interview with perennial screen weasel David Patrick Kelly, who stole the show in classics like The Warriors. Commando, Dreamscape and Last Man Standing, before being one of the best characters in last year’s action masterpiece, John Wick. The team also got orthotic and put together a decent Mephisto feature that sheds some light on the billion dollar business built on uncompromised comfort, and how Arnie (star of the aforementioned 1985 fleck-suited, neck breaking, synth and kettle drum soundtracked favourite) and Pavarotti were fanatical about the brand’s offerings, complete with a shot of the rotund tenor wearing a pair — no shot of a rapper in freebie shoes without the super-soft walking experience can match that swagger. Proper’s new issue is a belter too, and they’ve gone Hollywood on us too — the illustrated guide to outfits in films is way better than another know-nada Steve McQueen fetish feature, singling out a few lesser-discussed sartorial screen moments, while Russ from TSPTR’s vintage sweatshirt collection will make you jealous.







Long before A$AP and adidas crossed paths, the connection between Rocky and the three-stripes helped pave the way for hip-hop history. After Nike endorsed Stallone in 1982’s Rocky III, adidas had made friends with the Italian Stallion in subsequent years , leading up to the fourth chapter. Before the strange bit where it claims that he discovered Run-D.M.C. breakdancing in the mid 1980s (probably not true — b-boying was never their forte and they’d put out an album by 1984), Barbara Smit’s Pitch Invasion is a great source of information on “Mr. adidas” himself Angelo Anastasio. the entertainment promotion man behind that pioneering footwear deal. Anastasio went from a mid 70s pro with New York Cosmos to the Ferrari-driver schmoozing around Hollywood. From Paulie’s robot (after Paulie went from violent woman beating drunk to loveable oaf in line with the franchise’s increased shine) to Vince DiCola’s War — a composition capable of getting a pacifist pumped enough to put their fists through a kebab shop window —it’s understandable that this heavy-handed red menace tale is a fan favourite (I’m a Clubber Lang man myself). I can’t help but think that the only thing more 1980s than Rocky IV, is the thought of Anastasio making power moves around 1985 on the streets of Los Angeles? The world needs a documentary on that pre-Yeezy heyday of entertainment marketing.