Category Archives: Apparel



BEAMS seems to manage a curiously Japanese ability to balance credibility and nuance with a retail empire, so it figures that their 40 YEARS OF TOKYO FASHION & MUSIC campaign was going to be good. I wasn’t expecting this level of good though. The WHAT’S NEXT? TOKYO CULTURE STORY video and site are styled nicely, calling out hundreds of specific trends year by year (note the 1999 “UK skater style“) that are still echoing in fashion right now. Continue reading BEAMS DOES IT BETTER



I still don’t think that there’s enough detail online regarding Russell Waterman and Sofia Prantera’s Holmes brand. The predecessor to the seminal Silas line ran from around 1994 to 1998 before its successor took over. Shifting from intelligent printed pieces to knitwear, fleeces, skirts and outerwear, this British skatewear label with superior men and women’s offerings took influence from an array of American and European staples was the blueprint for what causes some queues in the modern age. Despite this 1997 i-D magazine feature (a perfect example of how far the brand had evolved since its inception), illustrated by regular visual partner James Jarvis, being very much of its time, Holmes (which, according to one old 1994 feature in the equally defunct Select, was allegedly named after legendary cinematic swordsman John Holmes) was far, far, far ahead of its time in experimenting with the perimeters of where Slam City-centric clothing could be taken and sending it in all kinds of directions without losing focus. Rarely discussed, but extremely important.


The abundance of 60 minute plus podcast conversations out there, soundtracking my working day, means that a lot of behind-the-scenes characters are getting their opportunity to tell the stories I’ve always wanted to hear — familiarity from another angle always seems fresh, instead of the usual assumptions or third-hand storytelling. Tremaine and Acyde’s No Vacancy Inn Soundcloud account is an informational treasure trove if you pick the right episodes. Chicago-raised model, producer, DJ and doer Lono Brazil’s name has cropped up over the years, but I’ve always wanted to hear his story in a more comprehensive way than the brief videos and bios on the web. Brazil was an original Stüssy Tribe member (Albee Ragusa is another Tribe legend I want to hear more about too). The self-proclaimed subcultural Forrest Gump has been in a lot of interesting situations at the right time, and his role at Capitol Records put hm in the middle of some very interesting mid 1990s hip-hop projects. We might focus on the youth when it comes to cultures, but with age there’s anecdotes and an abundance of inspiration.


Almost a year after Tommy Hilfiger’s memoir American Dreamer comes out, it would seem that we’re getting a Ralph Lauren autobiography. Releasing next September via Simon & Schuster to coincide with the company’s 50th anniversary, my earlier speculation about whether the Alan Flusser Lauren book that drops the same month was going to be an autobiography was wrong. Just as 2016 spawned two Lo-Life books, 2017 is going to be all about publications regarding the man himself. Hopefully, just as Phil Knight’s Shoe Dog offered personal insight that complimented the unauthorised Swoosh perfectly, hopefully this one will be as interesting as the almost authorised Genuine Article. In the meantime, YouTube user Tenaciously Procrastinate’s upload of Ralph’s 1993 Charlie Rose appearance is worth watching.



I haven’t got too much to say this evening, but I’m always surprised that a lot of the more interesting Nike apparel hasn’t made a return in these thrift-and-resell hype days. Some old creations resurrected using Tech Fleece or F.I.T. fabrics with accompanying shoes from the eras? I’d be down. Though it’s unlikely that I could pull off a Sharks basketball vest. These snippets of catalogue line art from between 1987 and 1988 are the tip of a particularly lurid and excessively patterned iceberg. Continue reading MORE OLD GARMS



I see a lot of photo shoots that feature scowling people in sportswear standing near housing estates. It’s the formula that superseded men dressed like 1940s train drivers in parks for look books, but I’ve never seen it done better post-millennium than with french photographer Patrick Cariou’s Marseillais Du Nord shoot for the winter 2002 issue of THE FADER. Continue reading MARSEILLE 2002